Several Surefire Methods For Finding Your Lost Snake

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Several Surefire Methods For Finding Your Lost Snake

I’ve yet to meet a snake owner, especially those that own constrictors, who haven’t had to go searching their homes or yards because it escaped. Snakes are thin, strong, and extremely intelligent when it comes to escaping their confines or going wherever they want to go. Once they’re out, it’s quite a challenge to find them. It’s as if they have a sixth sense to hide where no one can find them, even it it’s in plain sight! One thing that owners have on their side is that often snakes are not big travelers. In order to conserve energy, they like to find tight, dark spaces and hide rather than, like a dog, travel as far as they can go. In one instance I found someone’s red-tailed boa constrictor wrapped around the strap of a book bag in the person’s basement 3 feet away from the escape point. It was camoflauaged so well that I missed seeing it the first time through the basement during my initial search. Often people think that if their pet has gone missing and they haven’t seen it for 5 days that the pet has traveled for 5 days straight. This can sometimes be true for dogs. Reptiles, and in particular snakes, however, do not behave in this way. Don’t overestimate their travel distance. Look everywhere, including areas right out in the open. Usually if a snake escapes from its housing in a room of a home, it’s likely still in the same room. If the snake can’t be found after an initial search then there are some proactive ways to go about getting it back. Every home has cracks and holes of some kind that a snake would love to hide in. Try using a metal coat hanger to probe areas that could be great hiding spots. First untie the coat hanger and then wrap some masking tape around one end so that it’s not sharp. The last thing you want to do is to puncture your pet! Then gently insert the coat hanger into potential hiding places. Some great places to try this outside include holes in trees and railroad ties. Remember that if a snake can swallow a huge rat or egg then it has great stretching ability and can enter holes that you’d unlikely even think were possibilities. Another simple and common way to find a snake is the “flour on the floor” technique. This is more a way of determining that a snake is in an area rather than actually capturing it. If you have a tiled floor or cement basement, spread flour around at night. Snakes are very active in the dark. In the morning it’s possible to see visible “snake tracks” through the flour. If so, then you can narrow your search. A third method is to actually attempt to trap your snake. Get a large cardboard box and cut a circular hole near its base. Turn the box upside down on the floor of an area where the snake might be. The only entrance into the box is through the hole. Then, purchase a small metal mouse cage and put a mouse inside of the cage. Put the entire cage into the box. During the night the snake will smell the mouse and enter the box through the hole. It’s likely you’ll find your snake in the box in the morning. If you have a cold house, a small space heater near the box will help, or turn your heat up so that the snake is sure to be active.